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Selling EEE or Batteries to Ireland; are you compliant?

Are you selling your electrical products or batteries in the Republic of Ireland? Are you doing this without an Irish presence?

With the commencement of the WEEE Recast earlier this year, one of the changes highlighted that has come into effect is the need for an “authorised representative” when distance selling. If this is something that affects your business ecosurety can help.

The directive states that a producer selling EEE to another Member State by distance selling, must ensure that it “appoints an authorised representative in that Member State as the person responsible for fulfilling the obligations of that producer.” The representative cannot be the relevant agency or a Scheme in the Member State, and should be identified as such by written mandate.

The idea is to ensure that duplicate charges are not applied for multiple registrations in Member States, as well as to reduce the administrative burden on distance sellers. Batteries are reported at the same time under the WEEE regulations in Ireland, as an 11th category, so whether you are just a batteries or WEEE producer, or both, you will have an obligation.

Non-compliance can result in prosecution, with fines and costs being imposed.

Don’t risk non-compliance; if this applies to you ecosurety can help. We can assist you to be compliant in Ireland by getting you registered with the relevant agency and scheme. If you would like to know more give us a call on 0845 094 2228 or email weee@ecosurety.com.


Robbie Staniforth

Policy manager

As policy manager, Robbie is responsible for liaising with government, regulators and industry organisations to represent our members’ views and interests. In previous roles, he helped to instigate market-based change and he brings that dynamism to his current role of influencing regulatory change. With years of experience working across a number of departments at Ecosurety, it’s fair to say he has an excellent understanding of producer compliance and recycling, which enables him to provide high-level policy expertise, industry insight and market analysis to our members.


Written by Robbie Staniforth Published 22/05/2014 Topics Batteries

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